Volunteer of the Month: November 2017

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       Erik Baaske, CFA

Erik Baaske, CFA, is 2nd Vice President, Team Lead HFS Poseidon FX at Northern Trust. Erik joined the Membership Engagement Advisory Group in 2016. Shortly after joining the group, Erik presented an idea of expanding its outreach initiatives by conducting information sessions for summer interns at local financial institutions. He then planned and coordinated a session at Northern Trust this past summer where current CFA Society Chicago Chairman, Marie Winters, CFA, and CEO, Shannon Curley, CFA, spoke to 30 interns.

Erik is also a part of a small group that make calls to new members that join the Society. He places calls to welcome new members, shares information about CFA Society Chicago events, the use of function tickets and shares the benefits of serving on an advisory group. Additionally, Erik served as a panelist for the July 13, 2017 CFA Exam and Candidate Information Session.

CFA Society Chicago is grateful to volunteers like Erik Baaske for promoting the charter and making it possible to serve our members with the highest quality programming.

Industry Roundtables

On September 12th, CFA Society Chicago hosted its Industry Roundtables event at The Chicago Club. There were ten tables that focused on different sectors of the investment industry and participants chose three topics they wanted to learn more about. Each round lasted 30 minutes and gave attendees the opportunity to engage in face-to-face interaction with colleagues in a small group setting. Here’s a recap  by Richard Schiller, CFA, Rida Iqbal, and Susan Zeeb of some of the featured tables!

Equity Research: RJ Bukovac, CFA, CPA – Partner & Equity Research Analyst, William Blair

Bukovac is a partner and equity research analyst at William Blair focusing on Large and Mid-Cap US consumer companies. His team focuses on tech companies like Amazon, Tesla, Facebook, Netflix etc. They focus on market share value add against alternatives. Bukovac highlighted some of the qualities that are required for this nature of work:

  • Knowledgeable – Understand Accounting & Finance;
  • Inquisitive – to add value on top of management forecast;
  • Risk-taker – Willing to take a risk and bet on the company’s performance;
  • Convincing – Ability to sell it to clients to take investment actions.

He briefly discussed Netflix valuations in response to table participant inquiries which enabled him to demonstrate the everyday work challenges.

 

Fintech: Jim Daley, CEBS, CFA, CFP® – Project Manager, Morningstar

Fintech is one of the most popular discussions in the industry but also a very broad one that further understanding by the market participants. Jim Daley, CFA, shared his experience working for the Retirement Planning team at Morningstar. He was associated with Ibbotson Associates and continued to work with Morningstar as a project manager after Morningstar’s acquisition of Ibbotson Associates.

Daley introduced the table participants on basic branches of Fintech: Block Chain; AI Lending; and Machine Learning. He emphasized on the efforts in this area and that CFA Society Chicago is planning a series of events on the topic and how this is becoming a part of the CFA curriculum.

Daley is engaged in the retirement planning platform which is based on robo-advisor model which serves retirement planning (401K plans) by automating the investment strategies for discretionary plans like savings plan allocation of funds, quarterly rebalancing etc. This platform is capable of deploying both active and passive investment strategies. He explained how the traditional process of investment strategies has eliminated a sizeable amount of human interaction which now is only needed to review fund portfolios. Although Morningstar is currently offering a very limited Fintech related service, this current robo-advisor model could be replicated and expanded to Morningstar IRA planning accounts and retail. Fintech appeals to an age group of 30+ with some accumulated assets but the scope is growing constantly as people develop a greater understanding of how Fintech can serve the markets. Daley noted that Programming/Developing Languages, Statistics and Product Management skills are highly sought for in this area of industry and people with Engineering backgrounds and knowledge of C++, R, Python may do well in this field.

 

Fixed Income – Research: Rick Tauber, CFA, CPA – Senior Vice President, Morningstar

Tauber described his experience for the group which included roles as general credit analyst, high yield analyst, bank loan analyst, private placement analyst, and corporate bond analyst.  He explained how his role at Morningstar evolved from credit research to the corporate bond rating agency at the firm where he also covers industrials and manages the corporate team.

Tauber explained the different dynamics between buy side research, sell side research and agency research. Fixed income research on the buy side is usually team focused and the client is the portfolio manager/trader. Sell side fixed Income research is marketing and publishing oriented, with the client being buy side bond investors. Agency research is highly regulated with no conflict of interest as ratings are unsolicited, uses a committee process and is focused on the filing documents. Tauber explained the different research techniques between hedge funds and long-term investors, where hedge funds would be potentially looking for short-term volatility trades such as capital structure arbitrage trades or bond issue covenant violation trades. Long-term bond investors would focus more on long term fundamentals of the bond issuer and where the bond could potentially move if it was upgraded, for example.

He was asked if quantitative analysis methods were used in his position and he noted that Morningstar’s corporate credit uses four pillars to evaluate credits including business risk (which includes Morningstar’s Economic Moat analysis), a cash flow cushion, a solvency score, and distance to default. Tauber noted that the analysts conduct due diligence interviews with companies that issue bonds.

 

Investment Consulting: Chris Caparelli, CFA – Vice President, Marquette Associates

Caparelli has 9 years of investment consulting experience serving primary consultant on several client relationships. His company is mid-sized with 50bn in AUM with 80% clients in the Midwest and competes with companies like Mercer, Aon etc. He discussed the structure of his organization with distinguished fee structures as being contract based retainer fee as against the popular performance based fee.

He pointed out that apart from research and analytical skills, sales and marketing skills are effective in dealing with clients and more of a consultant’s time is spent on such activities as the individual progresses. He discussed his day to day activities including quarterly client meetings, manager selection process etc. He advised the table participants to read extensively and to focus on behavioral finance for self-correction and client correction/dealing to be successful in this field.

 

Manager Due Diligence: Daniel Harris, CFA – Principal, Borealis Strategic Capital Partners, LLC

Harris reviewed his background in the investment consulting, fund of funds, and manager due diligence segments. His current firm is focused on providing seed capital to top tier, early stage investment talent in return for direct economic participation in their growth and success. Harris led a discussion of the hedge fund industry and manager due diligence. He noted that manager due diligence includes reference checks of managers/teams, a thorough track record analysis, and several interviews with managers/teams. It is very important to have an aligned fee structure at the outset and that managers should know their operational level or break even AUM (assets under management). He also noted that it is somewhat more difficult to evaluate quantitative managers but he would focus on their R&D efforts, or what the next alpha signal will be, for example. There are typically several warning signs that put managers on watch lists, including team turnover, AUM size (too big for the strategy), distrust issues, and knowing the reason that managers have sold their business, either to cash out or to get working capital to growth the business.

Harris said that 3 year performance track records are very important and are typical minimums for foundations and endowments for example. Patience is also required. His firm will help hire a CFO and investor relations person if necessary. A manager should also typically have personal money invested in the strategy and/or a large percentage of his net worth in the business, which speaks volumes in terms of alignment incentives. Harris noted that one skill required in manager due diligence is diligent note taking; logging all notes and discussions with individuals and in background interviews. Manager due diligence also includes networking within the industry.

 

Real Estate:  Jimmy Georgantas, CFA, CPA – Assistant Vice President, Asset Management, Boyd Watterson

Boyd Watterson is an asset management firm with a real estate portfolio invested primarily in office assets with over $2.0B in total assets. Boyd operates through three funds with the largest holding $1.5B, or 75% of total real estate assets under management. After a round of introductions, our roundtable discussion started with disruptions that we’re seeing in the real estate market. What many think of as a stable, low volatility, technology-light asset class, real estate is actually being massively impacted by technology. Companies offering shared office space such as WeWork, TechSpace, and Regus are taking large blocks of space in the office sector and then releasing space to smaller users for space ranging from as large as 1kSF to single offices and even just a membership plan offering access to a shared workspace. This dramatic change in the demand profile begs the question what the future of office leases will look like and further what will the tenants demand of their workspaces? What we have seen is that leases rates are getting shorter on average and as a result we’ve seen far less build-to-suit requirements.

The conversation shifted to a very topical retail sector and more specifically shopping malls which have been severely impacted as a result of ~15% annual growth in e-commerce sales. We delved deeper into the what is negatively impacted the sector and we concluded that market sentiment is overly bearish while the majority or retail real estate is experiencing steady occupancy with increasing rents particularly in well located areas. It is also important to realize that not all retail real estate is created equal. Grocery supported retail is still performing phenomenally well while the suburban big box malls in the tertiary markets are struggling. Smaller strip centers in well located areas remain fundamentally sound with the colloquial saying “you can’t get a haircut online”.

Finally, we wrapped up our conversation briefly talking about the commercial mortgage backed securities market (CMBS). This is particularly topical in today’s environment because these securities are typically written with a 10-year term and if you remember the peak of the market before the Great Recession was back almost 10 years ago (2007). Several of the CMBS’s that were issued in 2007 are looking to refinance with their debt coming due in 2017. So far with credit spreads near lows and increasingly low interest rates versus what the market offered in 2007, debtors are able to refinance these loans without much market interruption. To conclude, we can all agree that real estate is relatively illiquid asset class which makes the business a very personal business. Relationships with key leasing and investment sales brokers along with the tenant representatives can be the difference in finding success in this growingly complex marketplace.

 

Wealth Management: Brad Summers, CFA, CPWA, CRPC, Financial Advisor, Wells Fargo

Summers reviewed his background in the investment banking and capital markets before he eventually moved into wealth management. Summers noted several takeaways with regards to why one may consider a career in wealth management including 1) your client base is your own and will generally follow you to another firm if you make a switch, 2) there is flexibility on how to build your client base, 3) there is flexibility on what you do for clients in terms of investing strategies, 4) your career path is as long as you want to keep working with your clients. Summers stated that there are a variety of firms in the wealth management business and fee structures vary as well. A large reputable shop would provide compliance monitoring while a smaller registered investment advisor you may have to perform that role as well. There are also different tasks involved in wealth management including marketing and seeking out new clients to build your base, relationship building with existing clients so they are satisfied and would potentially give you referrals, and staying up to date on industry trends and continuing education. Estate planning is not typically covered in CFA exams but is covered in the CFP, so that would be one area where you would need to learn. There are also additional designations such as CRPC (Chartered Retirement Planning Counselor) and CPWA (Certified Private Wealth Advisor) that can help you differentiate yourself as well. There is no typical day in the job as the diversity of tasks is large but once you are established you will likely spend the majority of your time focused on what you like to do the most.  Summers noted that the career path requires very hard work for up to five years until you have built up a big enough book of business to be stable. If possible, starting your career with a private bank or wealth management firm or working with another advisor would give you good exposure to the holistic client management model.

Starting Your Own RIA Firm (Part 2): Tips for Marketing and Business Development

Many talented professionals some day dream of having their own business. In the financial industry this usually means being the trusted advisor and investor on behalf of individuals and institutions. On October 4, CFA Society Chicago and its Professional Development Advisory Group assembled a panel to discuss the challenges of building an RIA business for the second part of the Starting Your Own RIA Firm series. The process of business development, brand development and marketing were addressed by the panel.

  • Jennifer Aronson, CFA: Aronson, moderator of the panel, is managing partner with Mosaic Fi, LLC. In that role, she works with family offices and high net-worth individuals. Prior to founding Mosaic, Aronson had over 20 years of experience with Northern Trust and Brinson Partners. She is currently serving on the Board of Directors for CFA Society Chicago for a three year term (2017-2020) and is a member of the CFA Women’s Network Advisory Group.
  • Scott Bosworth, CFA: Bosworth is vice president and regional manager in the Strategic Relationships group of Financial Advisor Services. He is responsible for sales, leadership and management of some of Dimensional’s larger advisory relationships.
  • Andy Kindler: Kindler is managing partner at Xcellero Leadership. Xcellero is focused on facilitating solutions for developing individuals, teams and organizations to spur growth. Kindler has a wealth of experience from different industries both on the corporate side and consulting.
  • Laura Sage: Sage is director of marketing and investor communications at Castle Creek Arbitrage, a relative value hedge fund. Prior to joining Castle Creek, Sage was an independent equity options trader.
  • Mark Toledo, CFA: Toledo has over 40 years of experience providing investment advice to individual and institutional investors. He began his career at Aetna Capital Management and after leaving Mesirow Financial in 2003, he founded Total Portfolio Management, LLC, his own RIA firm. In 2013 he merged his business with Chicago Partners Wealth Advisors.

 

Aronson began the discussion by asking the panel to address the critical tasks of marketing and business development for newly formed RIA firms.

Marketing and Business Development

The panelists agreed that as in any business, a business plan must be created, and that plan must include a path to an effective marketing strategy. The leader of the new advisory firm should spell out his role and have goals. A statement of investment philosophy is critical to the process. Advisors should focus on why they want to do this, what is their passion? You need to stick to your expertise and not try to be everything to anybody. It is important to be true to yourself and be able to tell your story. New RIA’s should attempt to have client meetings scheduled weekly and if you believe a prospective client’s needs are outside of your expertise, refer them to someone else. Client referrals will be critical to your success; often you will get a referral back. It would be useful for a new RIA to have a five-year plan where years one and two would be devoted to getting your story out; you will probably need to pay bills from some other source. Years three through five is when you can expect your business to ramp up.

Targeting Institutional Clients

The universe of potential institutional clients is much smaller. Sage was the panelist with the most experience in this arena. Most pension funds and sovereign wealth funds employ consultants. You will market to the consultant, not the fund directly. There are proprietary databases that contain information on these funds which can be accessed for a fee. There are other platforms similar to “speed dating”, which can gain you some introductions.

Methods to grow the business

  • Social Media: The use of social media is a critical skill to garner and keep clients. Retirees are ubiquitous on social media sites. LinkedIn is a site that can be helpful. Congratulate clients and potential clients on life-events they post online. Follow their work and offer assistance if there are sudden interruptions in their careers. They will remember you for it. A clear and concise website for your business is a must.
  • Referrals: Referrals are the way in which you will grow your business. A vast majority of clients would be happy to give you a referral, however not enough RIA’s ask for this. It is wise to spend time teaching your clients how to sell you. Don’t be shy about asking your client for a referral, however, you never want to put your client on the “spot”, be clear as to why you are asking for this.
  • Public Speaking: The panelists encouraged prospective RIA’s to burnish their public speaking skills. When you present yourself to other people, either publically of privately, be passionate about your expertise. It is important that you are able to communicate your conviction. You may suffer some setbacks, but show no fear in your demeanor. If you are able to keep your level of enthusiasm high, people will want to be part of your success. Clients are more motivated to put their trust in someone who can communicate vision and strategy with confidence.

There was a brief question and answer session with the audience at the end of program. There were inquiries on how to “close”, whether to remain independent or affiliate with an institution, and what functions to outsource. The panelists termed “closing” as the natural outcome of a positive meeting, once again there should be no fear in the “ask.” Typically affiliating with an institution is something that is done after establishing your business. Outsourcing functions can be expensive, but pay dividends down the road. You must look at your skill set to determine if some functions are better left to others.

 

Water’s Impact on Investing

On September 26th, CFA Society Chicago hosted a panel discussion in the Vault Room at 33 North LaSalle on the implications of the worldwide scarcity of potable water. The panel was focused on how this water scarcity may affect future investing. The lack of usable water is an “obvious” danger that does not garner a lot of attention at the moment.

The moderator and three panelists brought their perspectives to this worsening condition.

Michelle Wucker: Wucker, moderator of the panel, is a Guggenheim Fellow and founder of Gray Rhino & Company. A Gray Rhino as defined by Ms. Wucker is an obvious danger that many people ignore. Her expertise is in strategy, public policy and crisis management. She is the author of the book “The Gray Rhino:  How to Recognize and Act on the Obvious Danger We Ignore”.

Dr. Dinah Koehler: Koehler has primary responsibility for the overall product positioning and development of Sustainable Equity Strategies and ESG database development at UBS Asset Management. She is a recognized researcher on corporate sustainability.

Dr. Bruce Gockerman: Gockerman specializes in the use of cross disciplinary analytics to understand and address complex issues and environments. In addition to his consulting work, he is a faculty member at Illinois Tech Stuart School of Business.

Lauren Smart: Smart is Global Head Financial Institutions Business with Trucost. She is an expert in sustainable finance and has advised money managers on how to integrate climate change into investment decision making.

Wucker began the panel discussion by stating that the demand for portable water is forecast to continue to outstrip supply. Current thinking is that 1. By 2030 demand will be 40% more than supply, 2. By 2050 global GDP may be reduced by 6% due to this shortage and 3. 43% of corporate CEO’s believe that their businesses will be impacted by this looming shortage.

The first panelist to speak was Koehler who presented four slides that geographically mapped out an investment opportunity set based on global water risk. The slides included:

  • Global Water Risk Map
  • Investment Challenges
  • Negative Impacts of Investment
  • Opportunities for Impact by Geography.

The slides illustrated that the greatest investment opportunities are located in densely populated areas with scarce water resources.

In response to a question from the moderator, Koehler stated that at the moment, most financing for water investment is coming from the World Bank. She expects the private sector to be taking a bigger role.

Gockerman, the second panelist, stressed six points that he believed has worsened the supply/demand equation.

  1. Governance is very weak (mainly local)
  2. Pricing does not include the cost of water (infrastructure only).
  3. Under investment has led to a deteriorating infrastructure.
  4. Needed capital must be focused on the “resilience” of any infrastructure.
  5. Investing impacts must include addressing increasing risk.
  6. Resulting opportunities

Gockerman pointed to the recent hurricane flooding in Houston as illustrating a lack of resilient infrastructure. Investments need to be made into better pumps, advanced technology and better designed large scale projects. He suggested that perhaps a “Marshall Plan” that included public/private partnerships may be a solution.

In response to a question by the moderator, Gockerman stated that current federal policy is mainly derived from the Clean Water Act enacted in the early 70’s. He reiterated that there is a need for the entire system to be rebuilt and expanded.

Smart was the third panelist to speak. She focused on the impact of dwindling water resources on agriculture and energy. Water stress with respect to crop production was illustrated on a slide she presented. The ratio of water withdrawal to supply can exceed 80% in areas where critical crops such as wheat and corn are grown.

In another slide, Smart illustrated that the price of water in most countries does not reflect actual supply or cost. Cities in arid countries like Cairo and Jeddah have much lower prices for water than cities like Copenhagen or Atlanta. These prices do not reflect true cost, are heavily subsidized and cannot be sustained.

After the presentation, there was a question and answer session. Some of the questions revolved around how regional or national solutions may help. Would a regional grid like an electric utility be workable? This is probably not doable since water resources are divided up into different aquifers across the US. Gockerman stated the Great Lakes aquifer region would resist water being diverted out of its aquifer to other states. The panel seemed to agree that Water Bonds might be a good solution and could be funded by pension funds and foundations. Finally the panel was unanimous in stating that de-salinization was not the answer to any shortage as it is currently prohibitively expensive and energy intensive.

Networking with Leadership

CFA Society Chicago gathered on September 27 for the annual Networking with Leadership reception at the Hard Rock Hotel on Michigan Avenue. With no formal presentation or agenda, the members-only event provided a full two hours for networking, making new acquaintances, and renewing old ones. The venue at the Hard Rock included both indoor and outdoor space. A balcony directly off the reception room provided a view of the Michigan Avenue scene below, and was a welcome feature given the unusual warmth for late September. Judging from the nearly sold out attendance of more than 100, our membership values this opportunity for face to face conversations with board members about society business, financial markets, careers, or any topic that comes to mind. Anyone who missed it should make a point to attend next year.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How CFA Charterholders Can Become Investment-Grade Writers

CFA charterholders are by de facto investment writers; Writing is the primary way of communicating investment ideas and we are judged by the quality of our ideas in written format. Bad writing can be a major career risk and it is a skill that we should focus on. There are a few reasons why we financial types typically resist improving our writing skills. One, we say “I’m a numbers person, not a words person.” While you may be a numbers person, you live in a world where you need to be able to be both types of people. Two, you feel that writing is an innate skill and you don’t have it. This is not true, if you focus on writing and practice it, you can become a better writer.

On August 15th, CFA Society Chicago welcomed Scott Wentworth, founder of Wentworth Financial Communications, to help attendees learn how portfolio managers, analysts, and other investment professionals can enhance the returns of their writing efforts by following a disciplined, repeatable process.  Wentworth explained six keys to improving your writing.

  • Trust the Process
  • Tell your Alpha story
  • Don’t bury the Lead
  • Overcome the Curse of Knowledge
  • Attack the Misconceptions
  • Narrow the Scope

Mr. Wentworth noted that in the same way you have an investment process; you also need a process for writing. There are several steps to the writing process including brainstorming, researching, making an outline, writing, and editing. When brainstorming, putting ideas down on paper will help you start identifying themes. When researching, gather your inputs and narrow the focus of the article. Be sure to make an outline, which will help organize the ideas, identify headlines and sub-themes, and will create the roadmap for the article. For the actual writing portion, he suggested getting “chunky” and setting aside blocks of time to write. Writing takes a lot of concentration and you should eliminate as many distractions as possible. Find a different location or empty office, and then just pull the trigger and do it!  The last process of writing is editing. You should first take a mental break and then come back and read your piece out loud. Also have a friend or co-worker edit the article, as it is hard to edit your own work.

When you tell your Alpha story, you need to focus on a compelling way to articulate your thesis, explaining why it exists and telling where it came from in a qualitative manner. You can be more creative in this step. Story telling should incorporate anecdotes, examples, and analogies that help the reader visualize what you are writing about.

The headline is valuable real estate in your article, so don’t bury the lead. You need to be able to capture the reader’s attention span so that they read the article and don’t just skim it. You should write like a journalist: give the conclusion at the beginning and then back it up with your facts and insights.

To overcome the curse of knowledge, put yourself in the reader’s shoes.  Avoid writing over their heads and say things clearly and plainly; be sure to avoid jargon. When you make a complicated topic accessible, you appear smarter to your audience. Be sure to spell out your line of reasoning and take them through your thesis step by step.

When attacking the misconceptions you should be aware of what the audience knows. Then focus on completing their level of knowledge by addressing the myths and facts. It will also allow you to make the topic relevant to your audience. This also saves time and will keep your article focused and shorter in length.

To narrow the scope of an article, it is better to go deep into the subject to showcase your expertise. If the scope is too broad, your article will be too big and too long. Smaller pieces allow more specific insights and avoid high level general insights.

In review, the six keys to improving your writing are trust the process, tell your Alpha story, don’t bury the lead, overcome the curse of knowledge, attack the misconceptions, and narrow the scope.  If you are able to follow these key items, you will be able to produce good writing and improve your writing skills and communication with your clients.

Why do Ethics and Standards Matter?

Adding “CFA” next to your name is more than a sign that you passed three rigorous exams. It’s also a sign of an ongoing commitment to high standards and ethics – a benchmark for investment professionals around the globe, regardless of job title, cultural differences, or local laws.

But when we speak of the importance of “ethics and standards” as a whole, we sometimes gloss over what each half of that equation really encompasses – and, more importantly, why each is important for our profession.

Ethics

Ethics are the basic principles that guide how we choose to act. They are how we can talk about “right” vs. “wrong” so that we can choose “right” and point out “wrong” when we see it.

If a doctor fails to “Do No Harm,” he loses his medical license; in a sense, an unethical doctor isn’t a doctor at all.

In the same way, CFA charterholders found to be in violation of our ethical code are sanctioned and revoke their right to use the CFA designation. It’s hard to argue with the ethical guidelines that CFA Institute has laid out for our profession:

  • Place the integrity of the profession and the interests of clients above your own interests
  • Act with integrity, competence, and respect
  • Maintain and develop your professional competence

We all know the shadow that bad actors can cast on our industry, so having a hard line differentiating them from real professionals is important for maintaining trust in our profession.

Standards

If ethics are the values behind right vs. wrong, standards are how we define specifically what ethical professional conduct looks like. They’re a more concrete guide for our industry and the current moment in time.

While not universal for everyone in the investment industry, CFA Institute believes standards should center on transparency and putting the investor first. After all, that’s what finance is for: the benefit of clients, and the businesses and communities they invest in.

In the Code and Standards, CFA Institute defines duties that professionals have to the investment profession, capital markets, clients, and employers. There are also specific standards about diligent investment analysis, disclosing conflicts of interest, adhering to duties of loyalty, prudence and care, and addressing the suitability of investments and confidentiality.

It is important to lead by example. But our own actions won’t change the public’s perception. Guided by our strong ethical foundation, we can call for higher standards across our industry. It’s why we at CFA Society Chicago will offer free ethics training to Chicago-area pension plans, and it’s why CFA Institute calls for all who call themselves “advisers” to be held to a true fiduciary standard.

As charterholders, it’s our duty – each and every day, in every interaction – to take the high road. In today’s world of mistrust in our industry and salesmen masquerading as fiduciary advisors, adding the letters CFA after your name are more valuable than ever.

Vault Series: Gautam Dhingra, CFA, High Pointe Capital Management, LLC

On September 7th, the CFA Society Chicago welcomed Gautam Dhingra, CFA, the CEO and a portfolio manager at High Pointe Capital Management, LLC to discuss incorporating intangible assets and ESG factors into stock selection.

 

According to Mr. Dhingra, there are multiple examples of intangible assets; patents in the case of Qualcomm, brands like Pepsi and Apple, difficult to replicate assets like Union Pacific railroad, or sanctioned oligopolies like Moody’s, to name a few. When looking to use these intangible assets one should look beyond accounting data and focus on ‘what really matters’, or historical financials versus future economic profits. Much of the value derived from intangible assets, like the ones mentioned, cannot be found on a balance sheet, rather derived through future pricing power or lack of competition, for example. In the growing information based economy, traditional accounting won’t be as useful going forward and stock selection models must be adapted to incorporate intangible assets to find an edge and outperform. An increasing proportion of companies’ values are being derived by intangible assets, which poses a question; should one view Procter and Gamble and Qualcomm as peers, both benefiting substantially from intangible assets?  The answer is yes.

 

The speaker discussed another form of intangibles, Environment, Social, and Corporate Governance (ESG), which can be described as putting your money to work into companies that follow good practices, e.g. treat their employees and other stakeholders well. With employee satisfaction having shown a strong correlation to stock performance by one study, some 3.5% per year above its benchmark, adjusted for characteristics, which found that it could be a leading indicator to predicting earnings surprises.

 

High Pointe conducts its research into ESG and other intangible factors and inputs it into its model that combines ‘franchise quality’ and ‘expected growth’ in an effort to find great stocks. The company seeks to find a business’s ‘franchise quality’ by ranking stocks on a variety of factors, including ‘how good is the business’ (using barriers to entry, degree of competition, pricing power vs. customers, pricing power vs. suppliers, and suitability of advantage) and ‘how well is this being managed,’ which includes management, employees, and governance.

 

CFA Society Chicago Chairman’s Letter to Membership

Marie C. Winters, CFA

I am proud to report that thanks to the efforts of our volunteers, sponsors, and staff, CFA Society Chicago had a very successful FY2017. During the year, we hosted over 150 events to advance educational knowledge, professional excellence, and high ethical standards, and also to enhance the greater good of our community. We also finished FY2017 in a solid financial position with reserves of approximately $2.1 million, up 11% from the prior fiscal year end.

Highlights of our key accomplishments in FY2017 include the following:

Excellence in Education & Ethics

Our education programming spanned a variety of large and small events. Our popular monthly Distinguished Speakers Series drew top leaders, including Liz Ann Sonders, Charles Evans, Richard Driehaus, and Gary Brinson, CFA. Taking advantage of our new office location, we launched the Vault Series where we invited experts to speak on niche topics, including market signals for capital flows. At our 2016 Annual Dinner featuring keynote speaker Cliff Asness, we celebrated over 1,000 registrants for the second time. Investing in Innovation and Investing for the Long-Term consisted of panel presentations that also drew a large number of attendees.

We culminated our year with our largest Society event outside of the Annual Dinner: Active vs. Passive, featuring a discussion between Nobel Laureate, Dr. Eugene F. Fama and Dr. Robert Litterman. Over 400 people attended the event in Chicago and more than 200 additional attendees registered for the live webcast. Subsequently, over 2,000 individuals have watched the archived webcast, showcasing the value your Society brings to CFA charterholders globally.

Career Advancement for Members

Two years ago we committed to invest in our members’ careers. Our member-only program offerings have expanded greatly, focusing on development of soft skills and opportunities to explore alternate career paths at our Annual Career Fair and the Industry Roundtables event. During FY2017, we launched a new entrepreneurial series, Starting an RIA Firm. This has proved to be a big success with our members and we will continue to build on this series in the current fiscal year. Finally, we provided our members frequent occasions to expand their professional networks across our educational, professional development, and social events.

Giving Back to Our Community

The Society launched a financial literacy initiative that reached over 900 high school students in under-privileged neighborhoods by partnering with the Economic Awareness Council (EAC). The program experienced a strong start, attracting more than twice as many volunteers as we had targeted. Interest among our members in this program continues to grow and has already nearly doubled from last year’s volunteers.

Upcoming CFA Society Chicago Events
The Society is proud to announce these upcoming events:
  • September 26 : Education Seminars is hosting Water’s Impact On Investing;
  • September 27: Networking with Leadership;
  • October 3: Our next Distinguished Speaker is Ronan Ryan , President of IEX Group;
  • October 4: Starting Your Own RIA (Part 2): Tips for Marketing and Business Development; and
  • November 1: Our 31st Annual Dinner featuring Keynote David Rubenstein, Co-Founder and Co-CEO of Carlyle Group is at the Hyatt Regency.

Please visit our website at www.cfachicago.org to register for these events.

Looking Ahead to Fiscal Year 2018

Recently, I and the rest of the Executive Committee had the pleasure of meeting with several leaders of CFA Institute to further plans for the current fiscal year. CFA Institute is pleased with the Society’s efforts and will continue to provide solid support for us to pursue a variety of initiatives for education, branding, and technology enhancements, including a new website in the near future. We came away feeling that clearly, CFA Society Chicago is considered a leader among societies globally – we are well-recognized for our leadership and innovative thinking in education and ethics initiatives.

Over the coming year, you can expect to see efforts focused on preparing our members for the future. Many dynamic shifts are impacting our industry, including evolving investor preferences, technological change, and financial regulations, to name a few. These secular trends make it imperative that we have greater professional dexterity in meeting our clients’ expectations as well as in managing our careers. Our volunteers will continue to play a key role in helping all of us prepare for the future and thrive.

I am truly honored and excited to serve as chairman of the oldest and sixth largest CFA Society in the world. With over 4,700 members, CFA Society Chicago is well-positioned given our abundant resources – talented volunteers, dedicated staff, and financial position.

Very best,
Marie C. Winters, CFA
Chairman, CFA Society Chicago

Distinguished Speaker Series: Mario Gabelli, CFA, GAMCO Investors Inc.

Well known value investor Mario Gabelli, CFA, chairman and chief executive officer of GAMCO Investors Inc. and LICT Corp., addressed a capacity audience of CFA Society Chicago members and their guests at the Standard Club on September 14th. In a wide-ranging presentation, Gabelli drew on his four decades as a money manager to offer his insight and wisdom on the current state of the economy and investment markets. He began by extoling the virtues of a CFA Charter, pointing out that only through the detailed analysis of a charterholder could one understand a business well enough to see how it fits into the economy and how to value it correctly. He encouraged everyone to “keep doing what you are doing” to help our country and make capital markets work even better.

Gabelli touched briefly on two topics he believes need regulatory change. The first was ETFs and the advantage they have over mutual funds because of their tax-efficiency.

He strongly advocated for leveling the playing field with an end to the requirement that mutual funds distribute realized capital gains annually, thereby creating a taxable liability for investors even though they have made no transaction. Every other type of investment requires a sale to generate a capital gain, and mutual fund shares ought to be treated the same.

Second, on tax reform, he said Congress needs to cut the corporate income tax rate to make American firms more competitive with foreign ones.  The protracted debate is only serving to delay new investment that our economy badly needs.

Without going into great detail, Gabelli listed several sectors that he thinks currently offer attractive investment opportunities, including:

  • Infrastructure: Although this is on the top of many favored lists, he pointed out that the American Society of Civil Engineers rates infrastructure in the U. S. as D+, which will require new investment regardless of the political environment.
  • Health and Wellness: Drawing on the trend of an aging population, he recommended investments in vision and hearing care, joint replacement, and obesity treatment.
  • Live entertainment: Gabelli described this as being immune to competition from Amazon (or, more generally, the internet). Noting the high valuations put on sports teams in private transactions, he has calculated that a sum-of-the-parts analysis on Madison Square Garden Entertainment yields a value of zero for the New York Knicks.
  • Equipment rental: A secondary play on infrastructure, but one that he expects to do well even without that tailwind.