Executive Presence and Leadership Principles

Did you know it takes only four seconds to form an initial impression and 30 seconds to completely form a first impression? More shocking, 70% of workers are actively disengaged or not engaged per a 2012 Gallup survey. These statistics are not encouraging. On March 28th, after networking and snacks, Patricia Cook offered ideas on how to create better impressions and how to be in that 30% of truly engaged workers during CFA Society Chicago’s  Executive Presence and Leadership Principles event held inside the Vault at 33 N. LaSalle.

We know good leaders when we see them but what qualities should a good leader have? Attendees collectively offered Cook over 30 words and phrases. Building on that, we focused on six qualities and how we can individually build those out.

Great leaders:

  1. DSC_3647Have executive presence. People need to like you, trust you and want to be led by you. A leader with executive presence has charisma. The largest part of charisma is being present, self-aware and staying in the moment. Power poses increase confidence and charisma can be learned with practice.
  1. Leverage strengths and talents. Discover your strengths and the strengths of those around you. Develop and play these strengths. Your actual strengths may be different from your perceptions. A strength finder tool can help you separate perception from reality.
  1. Motivate others. Employees are most motivated by public appreciation and recognition of their accomplishments. Give employees a voice, make introductions for them, and let them know how their work impacts the bottom line.
  1. Communicate effectively. Ask “why” when working and problem solving. Also ask how you and your team can add more meaning to the work.
  1. Seek strategic opportunities. Make low points high points. Motivate and mentor. Reflecting is a key part of seeking strategic opportunities. Good leaders cannot be strategic without it.
  1. Drive for results. Set priorities and leverage relationships and teamwork. Ask for help with projects and tasks that are not your strengths. Focus on follow-through and ask for feedback.

This list may seem like common sense but may prove harder to implement in the hustle and bustle of our daily work lives. Remember, whether you are a junior staffer or the CEO, these leadership techniques can make you shine. In closing, Patricia noted that 85% of job success comes from people skills and the other 15% from technical skills.

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