Building Investor Trust Through GIPS

On May 9th, CFA Society Chicago members gathered to hear a panel of experts address the merits of adopting the Global Investment Performance Standards (GIPS) in the Vault Room at 33 N. LaSalle. The eminent panel comprised a service provider, a regulator, and an asset manager user and included:

  • Daniel Brinks, compliance examiner with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) with a focus on investment advisors,
  • Richard Kemmling, CPA, CIPM, CGMA, President of Ashland Partners & Company LLC, a specialty CPA firm that was a pioneer in the GIPS verification business, and serves over 700 client firms in that area.
  • Matthew Lyberg, CFA, CIPM, Senior Vice President and Director of Performance Attribution with Acadian Asset Management.

DSC_3715Anju Grover, CIPM, senior GIPS analyst with the Investment Performance Standards Policy Group of the CFA Institute (CFAI) served as moderator. In her opening remarks she pointed out that 2017 marks the 30th anniversary of GIPS which she described as one of the CFA Institute’s most successful products. Despite the fact that adopting GIPS is completely voluntary, they are widely recognized as a best practice for reporting investment performance by asset managers, asset owners, and consultants all around the world.

The first question Ms. Grove put to the panel was why GIPS would be important to retail investors. Brinks responded that retail investors are just as demanding of a performance standard as are institutional investors, and GIPS fills the bill. Lyberg noted that the line separating retail and institutional investors is blurring. The decline in the popularity of pension plans in favor of defined contribution plans is a primary example. Retail investors are the end users of DC plans and are responsible for investment choices, but the plans are designed, managed, and overseen by investment professionals. So they serve both retail and institutional masters. GIPS also adds a layer of due diligence to a plan, a theme the panelists repeated throughout the event. Kemmling pointed out that GIPS compliance is a common requirement for listing products on the investment platforms that advisors (he specifically mentioned Morgan Stanley and Merrill Lynch) use for their retail clients.

As to challenges firms encounter in adopting GIPS, the panelists listed:

  • Lack of adequate data, or records; difficulty in handling unique accounts,
  • Changes in operating systems that occur during implementation,
  • Incomplete buy-in from all parts of a firm (marketing, accounting, compliance, etc.), and
  • Full support from senior management. The latter point is particularly critical to assure firms commit adequate resources to attain compliance.

Why should firms bear the cost of GIPS compliance? Kemmling answered that they provide a “best practices” process for client reporting and that the verification process provides insight into industry practices. Brinks stated that while GIPS compliance is not required by law or regulation, he considers it in the category of “nice to see” when he examines an asset manager. The verification process is a second pair of eyes –outside eyes–on results reporting. He added that he observes fewer serious problems in general when he examines firms that follow GIPS. The CFA Institute has been training SEC examiners on GIPS so they can understand what the standards mean to adopting firms and apply that knowledge during examinations.

In response to questions from the audience regarding difficulties in complying with GIPS, the panel noted challenges in applying them to more complicated strategies such as currency overlays and alternatives. They suggested that this be a focus of the next revision to the standards which is already underway and targeted for 2020. This revision should also make the standards easier to apply to fund vehicles and for internal reporting to management. The current standards are most easily applied to reporting composite returns to clients, which was their original intent.

Regarding the breadth of acceptance of GIPS, Grover said the CFAI is still gathering data but counts 1,600 firms around the world that claim compliance for at least a portion of their assets. This includes 85 of the 100 largest asset managers who account for 60% of total industry assets under management. Lyberg noted that investment consultants are expanding the adoption of GIPS by using compliance as a screen for including firms in management searches.

When asked how a firm should begin to adopt GIPS, Lyberg suggested starting out modestly by writing high level policies and procedures and making them more detailed over time with experience. He recommended attending the CFAI’s annual GIPS conference to build knowledge and to make contact with other firms that have already adopted the standards. Challenges a firm may encounter include clients who demand using a different performance benchmark than what the firms uses for a strategy, tension between various stakeholders at a firm (e.g., between marketing and compliance), and resistance from legal counsel which often advises against bold statements of compliance that might seem to be guarantees.

As to the benefits to the public from using GIPS, Brinks stated that increased comparability leads to better informed investment decisions and more efficient markets. He noted the decline in fraud tied to inflated claims about performance since the introduction of GIPS thirty years ago. Kemmling noted that measuring the positive impact of GIPS is difficult but they were created for the benefit of investors and are an indication of asset managers’ commitment of resources in support of investors. Grover stated that adopting GIPS for greater transparency and comparability was simply “the right thing to do”.

For final takeaways the panelists offered the following:

  • Lyberg said GIPS levels the playing field among managers, adding that compliant managers couldn’t compete with fraudulent firms such as Bernie Madoff’s.
  • Kemmling, acknowledged that while compliance is not easy, it isn’t expensive and is certainly achievable. Most of the 700 firms his company verifies have less than $1 billion in AUM, indicating the success of small firms at complying with GIPS.
  • Brinks recommended that adopting firms think very carefully about how to apply the standards, looking to the future when writing their policies and procedures to avoid any potential conflicts between them and their capabilities.
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