Starting Your Own RIA Firm (Part 2): Tips for Marketing and Business Development

Many talented professionals some day dream of having their own business. In the financial industry this usually means being the trusted advisor and investor on behalf of individuals and institutions. On October 4, CFA Society Chicago and its Professional Development Advisory Group assembled a panel to discuss the challenges of building an RIA business for the second part of the Starting Your Own RIA Firm series. The process of business development, brand development and marketing were addressed by the panel.

  • Jennifer Aronson, CFA: Aronson, moderator of the panel, is managing partner with Mosaic Fi, LLC. In that role, she works with family offices and high net-worth individuals. Prior to founding Mosaic, Aronson had over 20 years of experience with Northern Trust and Brinson Partners. She is currently serving on the Board of Directors for CFA Society Chicago for a three year term (2017-2020) and is a member of the CFA Women’s Network Advisory Group.
  • Scott Bosworth, CFA: Bosworth is vice president and regional manager in the Strategic Relationships group of Financial Advisor Services. He is responsible for sales, leadership and management of some of Dimensional’s larger advisory relationships.
  • Andy Kindler: Kindler is managing partner at Xcellero Leadership. Xcellero is focused on facilitating solutions for developing individuals, teams and organizations to spur growth. Kindler has a wealth of experience from different industries both on the corporate side and consulting.
  • Laura Sage: Sage is director of marketing and investor communications at Castle Creek Arbitrage, a relative value hedge fund. Prior to joining Castle Creek, Sage was an independent equity options trader.
  • Mark Toledo, CFA: Toledo has over 40 years of experience providing investment advice to individual and institutional investors. He began his career at Aetna Capital Management and after leaving Mesirow Financial in 2003, he founded Total Portfolio Management, LLC, his own RIA firm. In 2013 he merged his business with Chicago Partners Wealth Advisors.

 

Aronson began the discussion by asking the panel to address the critical tasks of marketing and business development for newly formed RIA firms.

Marketing and Business Development

The panelists agreed that as in any business, a business plan must be created, and that plan must include a path to an effective marketing strategy. The leader of the new advisory firm should spell out his role and have goals. A statement of investment philosophy is critical to the process. Advisors should focus on why they want to do this, what is their passion? You need to stick to your expertise and not try to be everything to anybody. It is important to be true to yourself and be able to tell your story. New RIA’s should attempt to have client meetings scheduled weekly and if you believe a prospective client’s needs are outside of your expertise, refer them to someone else. Client referrals will be critical to your success; often you will get a referral back. It would be useful for a new RIA to have a five-year plan where years one and two would be devoted to getting your story out; you will probably need to pay bills from some other source. Years three through five is when you can expect your business to ramp up.

Targeting Institutional Clients

The universe of potential institutional clients is much smaller. Sage was the panelist with the most experience in this arena. Most pension funds and sovereign wealth funds employ consultants. You will market to the consultant, not the fund directly. There are proprietary databases that contain information on these funds which can be accessed for a fee. There are other platforms similar to “speed dating”, which can gain you some introductions.

Methods to grow the business

  • Social Media: The use of social media is a critical skill to garner and keep clients. Retirees are ubiquitous on social media sites. LinkedIn is a site that can be helpful. Congratulate clients and potential clients on life-events they post online. Follow their work and offer assistance if there are sudden interruptions in their careers. They will remember you for it. A clear and concise website for your business is a must.
  • Referrals: Referrals are the way in which you will grow your business. A vast majority of clients would be happy to give you a referral, however not enough RIA’s ask for this. It is wise to spend time teaching your clients how to sell you. Don’t be shy about asking your client for a referral, however, you never want to put your client on the “spot”, be clear as to why you are asking for this.
  • Public Speaking: The panelists encouraged prospective RIA’s to burnish their public speaking skills. When you present yourself to other people, either publically of privately, be passionate about your expertise. It is important that you are able to communicate your conviction. You may suffer some setbacks, but show no fear in your demeanor. If you are able to keep your level of enthusiasm high, people will want to be part of your success. Clients are more motivated to put their trust in someone who can communicate vision and strategy with confidence.

There was a brief question and answer session with the audience at the end of program. There were inquiries on how to “close”, whether to remain independent or affiliate with an institution, and what functions to outsource. The panelists termed “closing” as the natural outcome of a positive meeting, once again there should be no fear in the “ask.” Typically affiliating with an institution is something that is done after establishing your business. Outsourcing functions can be expensive, but pay dividends down the road. You must look at your skill set to determine if some functions are better left to others.

 

Water’s Impact on Investing

On September 26th, CFA Society Chicago hosted a panel discussion in the Vault Room at 33 North LaSalle on the implications of the worldwide scarcity of potable water. The panel was focused on how this water scarcity may affect future investing. The lack of usable water is an “obvious” danger that does not garner a lot of attention at the moment.

The moderator and three panelists brought their perspectives to this worsening condition.

Michelle Wucker: Wucker, moderator of the panel, is a Guggenheim Fellow and founder of Gray Rhino & Company. A Gray Rhino as defined by Ms. Wucker is an obvious danger that many people ignore. Her expertise is in strategy, public policy and crisis management. She is the author of the book “The Gray Rhino:  How to Recognize and Act on the Obvious Danger We Ignore”.

Dr. Dinah Koehler: Koehler has primary responsibility for the overall product positioning and development of Sustainable Equity Strategies and ESG database development at UBS Asset Management. She is a recognized researcher on corporate sustainability.

Dr. Bruce Gockerman: Gockerman specializes in the use of cross disciplinary analytics to understand and address complex issues and environments. In addition to his consulting work, he is a faculty member at Illinois Tech Stuart School of Business.

Lauren Smart: Smart is Global Head Financial Institutions Business with Trucost. She is an expert in sustainable finance and has advised money managers on how to integrate climate change into investment decision making.

Wucker began the panel discussion by stating that the demand for portable water is forecast to continue to outstrip supply. Current thinking is that 1. By 2030 demand will be 40% more than supply, 2. By 2050 global GDP may be reduced by 6% due to this shortage and 3. 43% of corporate CEO’s believe that their businesses will be impacted by this looming shortage.

The first panelist to speak was Koehler who presented four slides that geographically mapped out an investment opportunity set based on global water risk. The slides included:

  • Global Water Risk Map
  • Investment Challenges
  • Negative Impacts of Investment
  • Opportunities for Impact by Geography.

The slides illustrated that the greatest investment opportunities are located in densely populated areas with scarce water resources.

In response to a question from the moderator, Koehler stated that at the moment, most financing for water investment is coming from the World Bank. She expects the private sector to be taking a bigger role.

Gockerman, the second panelist, stressed six points that he believed has worsened the supply/demand equation.

  1. Governance is very weak (mainly local)
  2. Pricing does not include the cost of water (infrastructure only).
  3. Under investment has led to a deteriorating infrastructure.
  4. Needed capital must be focused on the “resilience” of any infrastructure.
  5. Investing impacts must include addressing increasing risk.
  6. Resulting opportunities

Gockerman pointed to the recent hurricane flooding in Houston as illustrating a lack of resilient infrastructure. Investments need to be made into better pumps, advanced technology and better designed large scale projects. He suggested that perhaps a “Marshall Plan” that included public/private partnerships may be a solution.

In response to a question by the moderator, Gockerman stated that current federal policy is mainly derived from the Clean Water Act enacted in the early 70’s. He reiterated that there is a need for the entire system to be rebuilt and expanded.

Smart was the third panelist to speak. She focused on the impact of dwindling water resources on agriculture and energy. Water stress with respect to crop production was illustrated on a slide she presented. The ratio of water withdrawal to supply can exceed 80% in areas where critical crops such as wheat and corn are grown.

In another slide, Smart illustrated that the price of water in most countries does not reflect actual supply or cost. Cities in arid countries like Cairo and Jeddah have much lower prices for water than cities like Copenhagen or Atlanta. These prices do not reflect true cost, are heavily subsidized and cannot be sustained.

After the presentation, there was a question and answer session. Some of the questions revolved around how regional or national solutions may help. Would a regional grid like an electric utility be workable? This is probably not doable since water resources are divided up into different aquifers across the US. Gockerman stated the Great Lakes aquifer region would resist water being diverted out of its aquifer to other states. The panel seemed to agree that Water Bonds might be a good solution and could be funded by pension funds and foundations. Finally the panel was unanimous in stating that de-salinization was not the answer to any shortage as it is currently prohibitively expensive and energy intensive.

Networking with Leadership

CFA Society Chicago gathered on September 27 for the annual Networking with Leadership reception at the Hard Rock Hotel on Michigan Avenue. With no formal presentation or agenda, the members-only event provided a full two hours for networking, making new acquaintances, and renewing old ones. The venue at the Hard Rock included both indoor and outdoor space. A balcony directly off the reception room provided a view of the Michigan Avenue scene below, and was a welcome feature given the unusual warmth for late September. Judging from the nearly sold out attendance of more than 100, our membership values this opportunity for face to face conversations with board members about society business, financial markets, careers, or any topic that comes to mind. Anyone who missed it should make a point to attend next year.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How CFA Charterholders Can Become Investment-Grade Writers

CFA charterholders are by de facto investment writers; Writing is the primary way of communicating investment ideas and we are judged by the quality of our ideas in written format. Bad writing can be a major career risk and it is a skill that we should focus on. There are a few reasons why we financial types typically resist improving our writing skills. One, we say “I’m a numbers person, not a words person.” While you may be a numbers person, you live in a world where you need to be able to be both types of people. Two, you feel that writing is an innate skill and you don’t have it. This is not true, if you focus on writing and practice it, you can become a better writer.

On August 15th, CFA Society Chicago welcomed Scott Wentworth, founder of Wentworth Financial Communications, to help attendees learn how portfolio managers, analysts, and other investment professionals can enhance the returns of their writing efforts by following a disciplined, repeatable process.  Wentworth explained six keys to improving your writing.

  • Trust the Process
  • Tell your Alpha story
  • Don’t bury the Lead
  • Overcome the Curse of Knowledge
  • Attack the Misconceptions
  • Narrow the Scope

Mr. Wentworth noted that in the same way you have an investment process; you also need a process for writing. There are several steps to the writing process including brainstorming, researching, making an outline, writing, and editing. When brainstorming, putting ideas down on paper will help you start identifying themes. When researching, gather your inputs and narrow the focus of the article. Be sure to make an outline, which will help organize the ideas, identify headlines and sub-themes, and will create the roadmap for the article. For the actual writing portion, he suggested getting “chunky” and setting aside blocks of time to write. Writing takes a lot of concentration and you should eliminate as many distractions as possible. Find a different location or empty office, and then just pull the trigger and do it!  The last process of writing is editing. You should first take a mental break and then come back and read your piece out loud. Also have a friend or co-worker edit the article, as it is hard to edit your own work.

When you tell your Alpha story, you need to focus on a compelling way to articulate your thesis, explaining why it exists and telling where it came from in a qualitative manner. You can be more creative in this step. Story telling should incorporate anecdotes, examples, and analogies that help the reader visualize what you are writing about.

The headline is valuable real estate in your article, so don’t bury the lead. You need to be able to capture the reader’s attention span so that they read the article and don’t just skim it. You should write like a journalist: give the conclusion at the beginning and then back it up with your facts and insights.

To overcome the curse of knowledge, put yourself in the reader’s shoes.  Avoid writing over their heads and say things clearly and plainly; be sure to avoid jargon. When you make a complicated topic accessible, you appear smarter to your audience. Be sure to spell out your line of reasoning and take them through your thesis step by step.

When attacking the misconceptions you should be aware of what the audience knows. Then focus on completing their level of knowledge by addressing the myths and facts. It will also allow you to make the topic relevant to your audience. This also saves time and will keep your article focused and shorter in length.

To narrow the scope of an article, it is better to go deep into the subject to showcase your expertise. If the scope is too broad, your article will be too big and too long. Smaller pieces allow more specific insights and avoid high level general insights.

In review, the six keys to improving your writing are trust the process, tell your Alpha story, don’t bury the lead, overcome the curse of knowledge, attack the misconceptions, and narrow the scope.  If you are able to follow these key items, you will be able to produce good writing and improve your writing skills and communication with your clients.

Why do Ethics and Standards Matter?

Adding “CFA” next to your name is more than a sign that you passed three rigorous exams. It’s also a sign of an ongoing commitment to high standards and ethics – a benchmark for investment professionals around the globe, regardless of job title, cultural differences, or local laws.

But when we speak of the importance of “ethics and standards” as a whole, we sometimes gloss over what each half of that equation really encompasses – and, more importantly, why each is important for our profession.

Ethics

Ethics are the basic principles that guide how we choose to act. They are how we can talk about “right” vs. “wrong” so that we can choose “right” and point out “wrong” when we see it.

If a doctor fails to “Do No Harm,” he loses his medical license; in a sense, an unethical doctor isn’t a doctor at all.

In the same way, CFA charterholders found to be in violation of our ethical code are sanctioned and revoke their right to use the CFA designation. It’s hard to argue with the ethical guidelines that CFA Institute has laid out for our profession:

  • Place the integrity of the profession and the interests of clients above your own interests
  • Act with integrity, competence, and respect
  • Maintain and develop your professional competence

We all know the shadow that bad actors can cast on our industry, so having a hard line differentiating them from real professionals is important for maintaining trust in our profession.

Standards

If ethics are the values behind right vs. wrong, standards are how we define specifically what ethical professional conduct looks like. They’re a more concrete guide for our industry and the current moment in time.

While not universal for everyone in the investment industry, CFA Institute believes standards should center on transparency and putting the investor first. After all, that’s what finance is for: the benefit of clients, and the businesses and communities they invest in.

In the Code and Standards, CFA Institute defines duties that professionals have to the investment profession, capital markets, clients, and employers. There are also specific standards about diligent investment analysis, disclosing conflicts of interest, adhering to duties of loyalty, prudence and care, and addressing the suitability of investments and confidentiality.

It is important to lead by example. But our own actions won’t change the public’s perception. Guided by our strong ethical foundation, we can call for higher standards across our industry. It’s why we at CFA Society Chicago will offer free ethics training to Chicago-area pension plans, and it’s why CFA Institute calls for all who call themselves “advisers” to be held to a true fiduciary standard.

As charterholders, it’s our duty – each and every day, in every interaction – to take the high road. In today’s world of mistrust in our industry and salesmen masquerading as fiduciary advisors, adding the letters CFA after your name are more valuable than ever.