Distinguished Speaker Series: Michael O’Grady, Chairman and CEO, Northern Trust

On June 13th local investment professionals gathered at the Chicago Club to hear a “fireside chat” with Michael O’Grady, chairman and CEO of Northern Trust. Marie Winters CFA, past chair of the CFA Society Chicago served as host and interviewer. To begin, O’Grady outlined Northern Trust’s core values that he said were the prime reasons the firm is about to celebrate 130 years of success, and why it remains independent at a time of rapid consolidation in financial services. These values are: service, expertise, and integrity. Northern Trust has focused on these since its inception, with the interpretation, or application, of them evolving to fit the times.  O’Grady expanded as follows:

  • Service applies not just to clients, but also to employees (or partners as Northern refers to them internally), and the community. A commitment of service to these constituents has always driven Northern‘s strategy. While the firm is known publicly for its key products (such as wealth management and asset servicing) it sees itself as a service organization.
  • Expertise is a point of pride for Northern Trust. It employs over 300 charterholders (the most of any firm based in Chicago) but the expertise the firm embraces extends beyond investment management to include other functional areas such as technology, and banking.
  • Integrity, put simply, means always doing the right thing, no matter how difficult. Again, the firm applies this broadly to relationships with partners and the community as well as clients.

Winters’s first question had to do with strategic changes that O’Grady had made since becoming CEO at the end of 2018 (or that he had planned for the near future). He did not answer specifically, but instead listed three drivers of success that he intends to emphasize: 

  1. Service excellence, a combination of his first two core values, which requires understanding the constant change in the business.
  2. Productivity, an absolutely critical need in a time of low revenue growth. Productivity improvements have been a focus at Northern for several years in a program called “Value for Spend”, which seeks to get more out of each dollar of expense.
  3. Investing for growth–determining where the firm should invest now to generate growth in the future.  Again, this reflects the recent history of slower revenue growth. 

Responding to a question about how Northern Trust is addressing the secular shift from active to passive management, O’Grady noted that Northern provides products that follow both strategies. The focus on efficiency is his key to success within passive products because of the low fee levels. Within active strategies, the focus is on leveraging Northern Trust’s expertise in factor-based analysis. Both of these product lines appear in their lineup of multi-asset class solutions.

When asked about investing for ESG (Environmental, Social, and Governance) factors, O’Grady said Northern Trust sees a clear and growing interest from clients. Designing and building such products requires a vast amount of new information and we are only in the early days of reporting that. Gathering accurate information consistently, and analyzing it thoroughly, will be key to success in ESG investing. This is made challenging by the changing nature of our economy.  The number of publicly-traded companies is shrinking, in favor of private companies. Obviously, public companies are more likely to report relevant data pertaining to ESG factors (and in a more consistent manner) than are private companies. So, even for the private equity investor, following ESG strategies is a challenge.

When asked about the importance of technology and digital innovation, O’Grady turned to data security. At front of mind for him was protecting clients’ private information. Technological innovation changes our world faster and faster (blockchain and cloud computing were two drivers of change he mentioned). With this change, clients demand more information, delivered more quickly, but the more we rely on technology to satisfy that demand, the greater the exposure to cybersecurity threats. Ironically, technology will have to be the principal tool in protecting against this risk. O’Grady then made an observation about technological innovation that illustrated one big way it has changed our world. He turned around the saying that “necessity is the mother of invention” to innovation being the mother of necessity. So, not only does technology allow us to do more with less, it also allows us to do things we never thought possible, never knew we could do, and even never knew we needed to do. This gets to the heart of the fears that technology destroys job opportunities. Rather, it creates more than it destroys.

The final area that Winters asked about was how Northern Trust is addressing diversity and inclusion. O’Grady said he’s proud of what Northern Trust has done so far, while acknowledging that the process continues. He specifically noted success in improving diversity metrics in hiring, especially for entry-level jobs, but sees more improvement needed further along the career path. That improvement requires new information that will inform the company on the causes of this shortcoming, and define the corrective actions. So far, they have learned that male managers tend to change roles more often early in their careers, giving the appearance of broader experience when they are considered for promotions. By measuring this and reporting it to managers Northern Trust can hold them accountable for removing any gender-based biases. Further, he noted the firm needs to be more active in assuring that development programs are open to women and people of color and the firm’s culture, which has served it so well for so long, may also have served as an obstacle to advancement. It must evolve to embrace a new commitment to improving diversity.

Diversity improvement was the subject of the first question from the audience about the differences in the various countries where Northern Trust has a significant number of employees. O’Grady acknowledged that policies and actions need to be tailored to the customs, regulations, and existing circumstances in each country. Gender equity is easier to address with consistent policies and programs around the world. However, ethnic diversity requires more customized solutions.

When asked how Northern Trust “walked the talk” on integrity. O’Grady listed three steps: 1) he repeated his rule of always doing the right thing; 2) being transparent, both internally and externally, so your stakeholders understand what you’re saying and doing, and can judge you correctly; and 3) leading by example because telling people how to behave is ineffective. They need to embrace the rules or customs.

When asked what companies O’Grady considers to be his most formidable competitors, he mentioned a few well-known financial services providers but his general comment was more insightful: they need to be mindful of the firms that are excelling at the things Northern Trust also needs to do well. The final audience question asked about Northern Trust’s strategy for growth. O’Grady summarized the firm’s revenue stream as about two-thirds from fees directly connected to the value of the assets they manage or service. They have no control over the value of those assets. The other one-third of revenue comes from earnings on the balance sheet, which are highly correlated to interest rates. Again, they have no control over the level or direction of change in interest rates.  So, they focus on the growth of new business because it’s the factor affecting profit growth that they have the most control over. Secondary factors include productivity improvements (that they see as an offset to inflation), and prudent investments in new businesses or technology.

Facebooktwitterlinkedinmail

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *