Present Like a Pro

In the third installment of a continuing series on communication, Scott Wentworth addressed members of CFA Society Chicago on how to make good business presentations on April 4th.  The capacity crowd of 90 in the Vault at 33 North LaSalle Street spoke to the popularity of the topic as well as the value of Wentworth’s previous two appearances before our society.  Wentworth founded Wentworth Financial Communications in 2015 to help financial businesses (especially investment managers) demonstrate their expertise through various forms of marketing content, including white papers, blogs, and newsletters. Prior to founding the company, he served as the head marketing writer at William Blair & Company. In his previous appearances with CFA Society Chicago (2017 and 2018), Wentworth addressed business writing, the primary focus of his company. This time, he spoke on oral communication, specifically how to make effective presentations.

Wentworth began by demonstrating (without announcing) several common presentation mistakes such as reading from a script, employing busy or confusing graphics, and relying on undependable technology. His point made, he quickly moved on to a very effective presentation embedding his recommendations within it. He pointed out that presenting is not the same as public speaking. A good presenter does not need to have a commanding presence or an abundance of charisma. Of greater importance is identifying and concentrating on one main idea, and then making a compelling case supporting it to the audience. Successful presenting requires skills that can be learned such as clarity, persuasion, concision, and good preparation.

Wentworth then went on to describe in detail his five tactics for a good presentation. First is identifying the goal of a presentation. He gave as examples motivating the audience to action, changing minds, correcting a misconception, or simply gathering information back from the audience. 

With the goal set, the second tactic is to analyze the audience. Is it hostile or supportive?  Uninterested or engaged? Uninformed or well-informed? This may be a difficult step if the presenter has limited information, but may be inferred from factors such as the type, purpose or setting of the presentation. It is important because it will direct the tone of the presentation.  To address a hostile audience, the presenter should emphasize areas of agreement first and seek out areas the audience would view as “win-win”. Whereas, with a supportive audience the presenter should reinforce their enthusiasm and provide an action plan or tools that lead to tangible benefits.

Wentworth described his third tactic as crafting your story arc. He admitted this is the most difficult aspect of a presentation because it is an art, not a science. It begins with identifying the one main idea he mentioned at the outset. This idea should be boiled down to as few words as possible and repeated throughout the presentation to drive it home.  In must be articulated early in the presentation to allow for this repetition, and also to protect against the risk of running out of time. Other features of the story arc include:

  • Using empathy to demonstrate that the presenter understands the audience’s situation and can help.
  • Focusing on the benefits offered rather than features (a common trap for investment managers who often focus on a product’s defining characteristics or performance).
  • Highlighting differentiating factors
  • Making things tangible.  Avoid abstract ideas, or if they’re necessary, convert them to a more tangible concept via examples or anecdotes.

The fourth tactic is creating effective visual aids. This can lead to another common error of presenters: considering the slide deck to be the presentation. Wentworth says it is not.  Rather, slides are a visual aid, just part of the presentation along with the equally-important delivery, the message or theme, and the interaction with the audience. He followed-up with a list of Do’s and Don’ts for slides.

Slides should

  • Reinforce the main idea,
  • Illustrate statistics or relationships,
  • Explain complex ideas, and
  • Keep the audience engaged. 

Slides should not

  • Outline the full presentation (they are just an aid),
  • Serve as a teleprompter, nor
  • Be distractive (too busy). 

As an aside, Wentworth recommended that the slides a presenter uses be pared down as much as possible with the bulk of the information conveyed by the presenter directly.  He recommended to having a more detailed deck as a “leave behind” for the audience.

The final recommended tactic is to practice with purpose for which Wentworth had several helpful hints:

  1. Do a dry run alone to learn the material and time the presentation
  2. Repeat with a reviewer (e.g., a co-presenter, team member, or even a spouse)
  3. Prepare for a failure of technology and have a plan B in case of a breakdown
  4. Don’t memorize lines. You’re likely to forget them which increases tension and nervousness.

Wentworth concluded his presentation, not by asking for questions, but rather asking the audience to provide examples of roadblocks or challenges they had faced in making presentations. Many offered up cases which proved to be good illustrations of how to apply the five tactics he had outlined. The discussion naturally led into a robust series of questions that extended for over half an hour. The level of audience engagement proved that Wentworth had both talked the talk, and walked the walk in demonstrating how to make a good presentation.

Past Wentworth Financial Communications Events:

Distinguished Speaker Series: Joel Greenblatt, Gotham Asset Management

Joel Greenblatt, the legendary author, Columbia B-school professor and hedge fund manager, presented his thoughts and methodology on investing to CFA Society Chicago and local investment community on Wednesday, December 5, 2018.

The title of his presentation compared value investing to the New York Jets, i.e. unpopular and out of favor. Per Greenblatt, where we stand today on a valuation basis relative to the past 25 years is that about 25% of the S&P 500 could be considered “undervalued” versus just 7% of the Russell 2000, if we assume the S&P 500 earns its long-run average forward return of 7%. Greenblatt also thought that the S&P 500 could earn a below-average 3%-5% return for the next few years.

In a statement that was likely no surprise to anyone in attendance, Greenblatt noted that “Growth” has outperformed the market the last 5 years. Greenblatt defined for attendees what the parameters were for a value investor (with all of these definitions supported by the Russell and Morningstar definitions:

  • Low price-to-book
  • Low price-to-sales
  • Low cash-flow valuation

What Greenblatt admonishes his students to aspire to, “Do good valuation work, and the market will likely agree with it”. Greenblatt noted he just wasn’t sure when the market would agree, but in theory at some point it will.

Greenblatt put up the chart that showed the classical individual stock return versus company valuation, and to no surprise to anyone, the overvalued stocks typically had the lowest forward returns relative to the lowest valuation. He also used the examples of two lectures he gave to a group of NY doctors who only asked what he thought the market would do over the next few years, versus the Harlem high school jelly bean test, and asking the kids to guess as to the number of jelly beans in the jar. Joel Greenblatt used the story to lead listeners to the conclusion that the kids in Harlem were closer to the right answer in terms of the accurate number of jelly beans in the jar, when doing their own homework versus listening to “word-of-mouth” guesses by the class.

It was clear that Greenblatt was more impressed by the analytical rigor of the Harlem high school class than the group of doctors, but he also used the story to illustrate the power of impression and what is heard by the retail investor and how emotion and psychology play important roles in investing. Greenblatt also talked about one of first books, i.e. The Big Secret for the Small Investor and the two most important points from the book:

  • 41% of the investment managers with the best 10-year track records also spent at least 3 of those years in the bottom decile of performance rankings.
  • The “Big Secret” is really just patience. Find an investment strategy that you are comfortable with and stay with it.

Greenblatt noted that the press’s preoccupation with Tesla is the “tyranny of the anecdote” contrasting that with deep value investing strategies and how they work over long periods of time.

The Q&A session noted that – not surprisingly – Greenblatt finds more opportunities in the smaller-cap universe despite the valuation comments from above. The valuation metrics aren’t “weighted” in that price-to-sales isn’t weighted more heavily than price-to-book although from his side comments and what were more impromptu thoughts by Joel, price-to-cash-flow and cash-flow health was rather significant.

Greenblatt did note that with “international” investing, the Professor’s fund trades long-only since with international there are trading costs, different forms of regulation, liquidity and other notable differences between US and Non-US investing.

 

*If you missed the event the webcast of the full presentation is still available to watch on the CFA Society Chicago website.

Vault Series: John Wightkin, CFA, TradeInformatics

On November 8, 2018, John Wightkin, CFA, a senior trade consultant at TradeInformatics, spoke at the Vault Series of the CFA Society Chicago about how the process of examining trading costs can help preserve portfolio alpha.

According  to John, “trading costs can represent close to half of active returns” and the process of analyzing and examining trading costs can help claw back those costs that preserve alpha. The dispersion of average trading costs can be between 3 and 48 basis points per the presentation. The process John outlined to combat these high costs has three basic steps:

  1.  Alpha profiling, which is the analysis of the firm’s linkage and relationship between the portfolio manager, trader, broker and analyst. The “alpha profile” tries to identify the unique DNA of portfolio ideas and then link the process to return preservation and implementation.
  2. Return preservation, which means looking across different participation rates and liquidity buckets for opportunities which might not be apparent. The participation rate refers to identifying active vs passive relative to market flow and the liquidity buckets are determining what order size is relative to average daily volume.
  3. Implementation is the last step to be considered and ought to be low-cost and transparent. The client firm will learn how to take control of trade execution on a specific platform to prevent information leakage, but also use the platform as a way to receive information about market flow and trade reception.

A case study was provided where TradeInformatics examined a hedge fund with 30 traders but no central trading desk. When the trades were working in the desk’s favor, there was an average of 12 minutes between trades, but when trades were working against the desk, or positions were losing, the average time between trades lengthened to 40 minutes. The conclusion drawn was that actual returns were 5.9% lower than “expected return” based on the actual trading patterns.

Using a healthy lifestyle analogy, TradeInformatics concluded that to reduce trading costs, the trading desks should “lose weight and eat a balanced diet” which translates into slowing their trading down and doing it more consistently over both sides of the market, i.e. whether the trades are winning or losing.

Summary / conclusion: The takeaway from John Wightmkin’s slide presentation was to slow down and be more consistent with a firm’s trading practices. The time differential between winning and losing trades was antithetical to the traditional practice within investing of “cutting your losses and letting your winners run”. Trade Informatics often found that the opposite was the case.

Trade Informatics can provide more discipline around the trading / execution process, for which the goal is to ultimately lower trading costs and preserve portfolio alpha.