Executive Presence and Leadership Principles

Did you know it takes only four seconds to form an initial impression and 30 seconds to completely form a first impression? More shocking, 70% of workers are actively disengaged or not engaged per a 2012 Gallup survey. These statistics are not encouraging. On March 28th, after networking and snacks, Patricia Cook offered ideas on how to create better impressions and how to be in that 30% of truly engaged workers during CFA Society Chicago’s  Executive Presence and Leadership Principles event held inside the Vault at 33 N. LaSalle.

We know good leaders when we see them but what qualities should a good leader have? Attendees collectively offered Cook over 30 words and phrases. Building on that, we focused on six qualities and how we can individually build those out.

Great leaders:

  1. DSC_3647Have executive presence. People need to like you, trust you and want to be led by you. A leader with executive presence has charisma. The largest part of charisma is being present, self-aware and staying in the moment. Power poses increase confidence and charisma can be learned with practice.
  1. Leverage strengths and talents. Discover your strengths and the strengths of those around you. Develop and play these strengths. Your actual strengths may be different from your perceptions. A strength finder tool can help you separate perception from reality.
  1. Motivate others. Employees are most motivated by public appreciation and recognition of their accomplishments. Give employees a voice, make introductions for them, and let them know how their work impacts the bottom line.
  1. Communicate effectively. Ask “why” when working and problem solving. Also ask how you and your team can add more meaning to the work.
  1. Seek strategic opportunities. Make low points high points. Motivate and mentor. Reflecting is a key part of seeking strategic opportunities. Good leaders cannot be strategic without it.
  1. Drive for results. Set priorities and leverage relationships and teamwork. Ask for help with projects and tasks that are not your strengths. Focus on follow-through and ask for feedback.

This list may seem like common sense but may prove harder to implement in the hustle and bustle of our daily work lives. Remember, whether you are a junior staffer or the CEO, these leadership techniques can make you shine. In closing, Patricia noted that 85% of job success comes from people skills and the other 15% from technical skills.

Volunteer of the Month: April 2017

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A Feltovich

Andy Feltovich, CFA

Since joining CFA Society Chicago in 2012, Andy Feltovich, CFA, didn’t hesitate when it came to answer the call for volunteers. Andy has generously given his time and talents by serving on the Education and Professional Development Advisory Groups.

Andy is currently the Co-Chair for the Professional Development Advisory Group but today’s kudos come from his work on the Education Advisory Group. Andy led a subcommittee that planned, “Investing for the Long-Term” event with top financial leaders including Robert Gordon, Deirdre Nansen McCloskey, Bob Browne, CFA, Rick Rieder, and Francisco Torralba, CFA. The event was moderated by Michele Gambera, CFA, and drew nearly 200 attendees!

Thank you Andy! We appreciate all you do for the Society.

Investing for the Long-term: Productivity of Capital Markets Expectations, and Portfolio Management

DSC_3571CFA Society Chicago presented a two-part symposium on Investing for the Long-term on March 7th at the Standard Club. Approximately 150 members and guests attended to hear Robert Gordon, Professor of Economics at Northwestern University and Deirdre Nansen McCloskey, Emerita Professor at the University of Illinois Chicago present their perspectives on productivity trends. Francisco Torralba, CFA, Senior Economist, Morningstar, Robert Browne, CFA, Northern Trust Bank, and Rick Rieder, CIO Global Fixed Income, BlackRock, then presented their outlooks for the capital markets.

Gordon highlighted the sharp slowdown in US GDP growth from 3.12% from the 1974 to 2004 to 1.56% from 2004 to 2015. He said that this slowdown resulted from a reduction in productivity growth and the labor force participation rate. He noted the Kalman Trend Annualized Growth in Total Economic Productivity, which rose to 2.5% in the 1990s because of the technology revolution, but has recently fallen to near 0.5%. The labor force participation rate has been affected by an aging population, fewer 18 to 25-year-old people in the work force, and passing the peak rate of growth for women in the labor force.

DSC_3590Gordon noted that growth and productivity are probably under estimated, but have always been under stated. He sees no indications that the distortions are worse today. He expects that both lower productivity growth and labor force growth will produce slower economic growth over the next decade.

McCloskey acknowledged that the current level of productivity growth has fallen. She observed that “falling sky” DSC_3579forecasts always follow events like the 2008 financial crisis and noted the perils of trying to predict future enhancements in productivity. She also stated that global economic growth will be positively impacted by developments in countries like China and India.

DSC_3587McCloskey highlighted her work on the role a change in attitude toward capitalism in the 1700s that augmented the 1st Industrial Revolution. She noted the evolution in literature from Shakespeare to Jane Austin in the portrayal of capitalist and the return on capital that they earn. Changes in attitude toward capitalism could drive growth in emerging economies.

An area of agreement between Gordon and McCloskey is the role of minimum wage laws and other restrictions on the labor market that prevent economic growth in areas like the west side of Chicago. They also support efforts to stop the “war on drugs” and support a negative income tax for low income people.

Outlook for Investors

DSC_3591Rick Rieder, CIO Global Fixed Income, BlackRock, noted the aging population and its demand for income and the role of technology pressing down inflation. He believes that the US economy is exiting an investment & goods recession. He also believes that September 2016 marked a turning point away from expansionary global monetary policy. He sees better economic growth leading to higher interest rates, and the potential for higher stock prices because of sales growth.

Francisco Torralba, CFA, Senior Economist, Morningstar, supports McCloskey view that trends in productivity cannot be predicted. He also foresees a pickup in economic growth and cited a Financial Analyst Journal article that links the payout growth rate to the GDP growth rate. A higher level of economic growth could be a positive development for equity investors through higher dividends.

Robert Browne, CFA, Northern Trust Bank, suggested that forecasters begin with “what’s easier to forecast.” He believes that identifying what is cheap is easier that what is expensive. In contrast, much of the forecast has been centered on the expensive, low yield bond market. He also noted that anticipating a range over the short-term is easier. Here, he believes that the election of President Trump may pull forward economic growth, which would be a positive for equity investors.

The consensus outlook seemed to be that long-term real returns for equities would be in the 4% to 5% range. These analysts generally favor US equities, US high yield bonds, natural resources, and emerging markets debt.

CFA Society Chicago Chairman’s Letter to Membership

img_1799Dear Fellow Charterholders and CFA Society Chicago Members:

Thank you all for your support throughout the first half of the 2016 – 2017 fiscal year.

During the first six months, the CFA Society Chicago Executive Committee traveled to multiple CFA Institute meetings and conferences to show our support, share best practices and network with other societies and CFA Institute peers. It is clear that CFA Society Chicago is an integral part of the global success of CFA Institute (CFAI). Our counsel is highly sought after on governance, event management and community engagement. We will continue to strive to be a global leader and aid our industry as we face the challenges ahead.

The 2016 Annual Dinner was a success and the feedback from the survey indicates that the attendees enjoyed the event. Our keynote speaker, Cliff Asness, PhD., provided an in-depth discussion on current markets and the challenges of today’s hedge fund industry. We are grateful for his time and informative insights. We would like to thank our staff for all their hard work as they organized another great event! Furthermore, thank you to our 60+ sponsors whose generosity provides invaluable financial support and signifies the value the Annual Dinner brings to our investment community. Thank you!

On March 7th the Education Advisory Group welcomed Robert Gordon, PhD., Northwestern University, and Deidre McCloskey, PhD., University of Illinois Chicago, at the Society’s Investing for the Long Term: Productivity, Capital Markets Expectations and Portfolio Management event. The speakers and panelists discussed how technology will affect the future of our economy and the investment implications.

Our local financial literacy efforts continue to gain strong momentum. Between October 2016 and January 2017, the program had 42 members respond to the initial call for volunteers with 22 members attending school visits at ten high schools. Our members also contributed to On the Money, an entrepreneurship, finance and business journal created by teens for teens, by assisting with the writing process, sharing perspectives, discussing financial concepts and serving as a sounding board. Our partnership with the Economic Awareness Council is thriving and we continue to receive positive feedback from the members attending these school visits. The Society also led an information session at the City of Chicago Treasurer’s Office in February 2017. A special thank you to all our volunteers, the Membership Engagement Advisory Group and Co-Chairs Maura Murrihy, CFA, and Aaron Taylor, CFA!

We were proud to again sponsor the CFA Institute Gender Diversity Conference held in Boston last fall. The conference provided a detailed argument for increasing success through diversity. We encourage all our employers to embrace diversity and we are happy to supply literature created by the Institute to support this effort. The third annual Alpha and Gender Diversity Conference will be held at the Westin Harbour Castle in Toronto, Canada September 18 – 19, 2017.

Other Society highlights for the first half include:

  • Oversubscribed demand for CFA Institute Scholarships: 49 applicants for 35 local scholarships.
  • Research Challenge started with 11 teams focused on McDonald’s. Illinois Institute of Technology won the contest and will represent the Society at the Regional contest in Seattle in April 2017. Congratulations and Good luck!
  • The Professional Development Advisory Group has rolled out its redesigned mentoring program featuring ten mentorships for a six month evaluation. Special thanks to Shai Dobrusin, CFA, Jay Bullie, CFA, and Umed Saidov, CFA, for their efforts in redesigning the program.

The 2nd Annual Financial Compensation Survey results are now available on our website in the Career Management section. The report compiles compensation practices in the Chicago area conducted in mid-2016. The survey requested data on numerous aspects of compensation. In addition to covering base salary and total compensation, the survey addressed the respondent’s CFA charterholder status, level of education, and occupation. Information on the type and size of the firm as well as the amount of assets under management was included in the survey. The survey captured annual salary change data and the respondent’s view on the adequacy of compensation and the desire to explore other job opportunities. We hope you all find this information useful.

We are very excited about the remainder of our fiscal year. To aid in professional development we will be hosting our Annual Career Fair on March 24th, and a presentation on Executive Presence and Leadership Principles by Patricia Cook from Patricia Cook & Associates on March 28th. The Distinguished Speaker Series will welcome T. Bondurant French, CFA, Executive Chairman from Adams Street Partners, who will provide an update on the Private Equity Industry on April 5th. There are also multiple chances for networking at social events throughout the year. All our events can be viewed on our website in the event section. Please join us!

Lastly, on Tuesday, June 13, 2017, we will be having The Active vs. Passive Debate: Trends, Insights, and Case Studies event. This event will address Trends and Insights into ETFs as well as reviewing Case Studies in the application of ETFs in portfolios. The keynote for the event will be Nobel Prize Winner Eugene Fama, PhD. He will be interviewed by Robert Litterman, Senior Partner at Kepos Capital. Mr. Litterman retired in 2009 from Goldman Sachs previously serving as Head of Quantitative Investment Strategies. This session is a reprisal of their interview five years ago from the CFA Global Conference held in Chicago. A special thank you to the Education Advisory Group Planning Committee: Garrett Glawe, CFA, Ben Johnson, CFA, and Cindy Tsai, CFA. This should be a thought provoking event as our industry continues to evolve rapidly.

These programs do not happen without the valuable time and efforts of our members. All of our programming is designed by volunteers sharing ideas on what is important to our industry, community and future. It is a great opportunity to meet fellow charterholders and build your personal network. Please consider joining one of our Advisory Groups and help deliver value added programming and services while helping to promote the charter in our community. For additional information and to learn more about volunteer opportunities please visit our website at www.CFAChicago.org.

 

Best Regards,

Douglas Jackman, CFA
Chairman, CFA Society Chicago

Vault Series: David Ranson, HCWE & Co.

David Ranson provided an enlightening presentation during the second part of CFA Society Chicago’s new Vault Series held on March 15 in the Vault Room of 33 N. LaSalle. Ranson is President and Director of Research at HCWE & Co., an independent investment research firm that was formerly a division of H.C. Wainright & Co. Ranson presented a simple, but effective model–based on his extensive research into capital market returns and correlations–that his firm uses to advise clients on tactical asset allocation. Their process uses historical market price movements to uncover predictive relationships between leading indicators and, highly-correlated, consistent outcomes.

The model’s simplicity derives from viewing the investment universe as comprising just four primary asset classes (exhibit 1):

  • Domestic bonds
  • Gold
  • Domestic equities
  • Foreign assets and physical assets (commodities, real estate, etc.)

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(It’s important to note that the model considers gold as uniquely different from all other commodities.)

Ranson began by describing the role of capital migration in investment performance (exhibit 2). Capital migrates away from countries or markets characterized by economic stagnation, lower asset returns, declining new investment, and rising unemployment, and will flow to areas where the opposite conditions apply. Causes of the poor performance can be excessive government spending, taxation, and regulation, and “regime uncertainty” stemming from secretive or unpredictable policies.  These are difficult to quantify, but are usually accompanied by two more easily measured indicators: currency weakness, and rising economic anxiety (i.e., market stress).  These two indicators are the primary market signals the model relies on.  The price of gold serves to measure a currency’s value, and credit spreads measure economic anxiety.Ranson 1_Page_03

Ranson described four economic scenarios arrayed in quadrants defined by the change in the rates of economic growth and inflation (exhibit 3). Accelerating growth occupies the two lower quadrants and declining growth the top two, while accelerating inflation resides in the two right-hand quadrants and decelerating inflation on the left side. The scenarios (quadrants) determine the best performing assets.  Haven assets (bonds and gold) do best in the two upper scenarios when economic growth declines.  Risk assets (equities and commodities) stand out in the lower half of the array when economies accelerate.  When viewed laterally, financial assets (Ranson called them “soft” assets) that struggle against inflation reside on the left side of the array and those that do better against rising inflation (“hard” assets) reside on the right side.  Hard assets include gold, other commodities, real estate, and foreign equities.  (All foreign equities fit into this category because the model assumes they would perform comparatively well when an investor’s home currency is weak.) Putting the model together, shows gold as the preferred asset in the upper right quadrant (decelerating growth with rising inflation) and bonds preferred in the upper left quadrant (both growth and inflation decelerating). Domestic equities shine in the lower left quadrant (rising growth and decelerating inflation) while commodities and real estate are best in the lower right quadrant when both growth and inflation rise.Ranson 1_Page_04

Ranson presented statistics to support his model (exhibit 4). Separating the past 45 years of available data for the United States, he showed that when the rate of GDP growth accelerated from the prior year, the returns on equities and commodities always improved, while returns on treasury bonds and gold worsened.  When the rate of GDP growth slowed from the prior year, the reverse relationships held: returns on equities and commodities fell, and those for bonds and gold improved.Ranson 1_Page_05

Looking at inflation rates revealed similarly intuitive results (exhibit 6). When the CPI accelerated in a year, financial assets (both stocks and bonds) exhibited weaker returns, and gold and commodities did better than in the prior year.  When the CPI decelerated, financial assets enjoyed improved returns, while gold and commodities worsened.

Putting it all together (exhibit 11), Ranson presented an Asset-Allocation Compass with north pointing to heightened business risk, increasing investment anxiety, weakening economic growth and widening credit spreads. South points to the exact opposite conditions. East points to a weakening, or unstable, currency (measured by the price of gold) and west to a strengthening currency. He then filled in the best asset classes for eight points around the compass. His four primary asset classes occupied the diagonal compass points, corresponding to their positioning in the quadrant array:

  • Gold in the northeast
  • High quality bonds in the northwest
  • Domestic equities in the southwest
  • Hard assets in the southeast

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Ranson assigned the primary points of the compass to sub-groups of the primary classes. The most intuitive one was Treasury Inflation Protected Securities (TIPS) pointing west (declining inflation, strengthening currency). Pointing south toward strengthening growth were risk assets: B-rated junk bonds, MLPs, and developed market foreign equities. Pointing east (rising inflation and a falling currency) were commercial real estate and C-rated junk bonds, assets exhibiting little influence from changing spreads and more from the price of gold. The distinction between B and C-rated junk bonds may be surprising but Ranson’s research has shown that while they are correlated to each other, C’s are much better correlated to the gold price while B’s correlate more to credit spreads.

The compass had nothing listed for north (weakening growth and heightened risk perceptions). Ranson noted that he was not aware of an asset class that would fit well in this slot but, like a gap in the periodic table of the elements, he could describe the attributes he expected it to exhibit. It would have to respond positively to widening credit spreads, and be little effected by the price of gold (or value of the dollar).

In response to a question following his presentation, Ranson pointed out that the correlations his model depends on often take several years to manifest themselves, so the model works best for patient investors with very long investment horizons.

CFA Society Chicago Book Club:

The Gray Rhino: How to Recognize and Act on the Obvious Dangers We Ignore by Michele Wucker

thegrayrhino-3D-coverOverlooking or underestimating obvious dangers is a timeless tradition. A man is terrified of planes but gets in his car every day and drives with no seat belt. A woman pays the fire insurance premium on her home religiously but doesn’t floss her teeth. People play the lotto but don’t take advantage of their employers’ 401(k) matching contributions. Organizations, including governments, are as bad or worse.  Passengers remove their shoes at airports to prevent a shoe bombing, which has been attempted once in human history—unsuccessfully—while infrastructure is allowed to crumble to the point of collapse, such as the I-35W Bridge in Minneapolis, Minnesota, that collapsed under the weight of normal traffic and killed 13 people. That catastrophe didn’t occur because it was rare, hard to predict or even unpredictable, a black swan in modern parlance from Nassim Nicholas Taleb’s 2007 classic of the same name.  Instead, those dangers are obvious and imminent; much like the danger of a charging gray rhino, from which Michele Wucker’s The Gray Rhino: How to Recognize and Act on the Obvious Dangers We Ignore (2016) derives its name.

In February of 2017, the CFA Society Chicago’s Book Club had the privilege of hosting Ms. Wucker in person to discuss her Book. The conversation was wide ranging and included water shortages, global warming, the Challenger Shuttle disaster, and many other topics. Why do we spend resources worrying about and preventing rare events but ignore or do nothing about obvious, preventable dangers? Ms. Wucker has several explanations from the social sciences: taboos about raising alarms, groupthink, anchoring and confirmation biases. She notes the origins of the sobriquet Cassandra, an unflattering term used to describe people who warn others about potential dangers. The original Cassandra was given the power of prophecy from the god Apollo. When she didn’t reciprocate Apollo’s affections, he threw a curse on her that prevented others from believing her prophecies, including her prophecy that the Greeks would attack Troy, which is what ultimately happened. The negative connotations that are associated with the name of someone who correctly warned others about impending danger speaks to deep seated cultural aversions to raising alarms. That negativity combined with the fact that Cassandra was a woman who was punished for shunning the advances of a male superior is a similarly depressing statement about society.

With the manifold existence of Gray Rhinos and their causes firmly established, the question turns to their taxonomy and life-cycle. Ms. Wucker identifies eight types and five stages of a Gray Rhino.  The eight types include the “Inconvenient Truth” Gray Rhinos that are widely recognized but not acted upon due to denial, including manufactured denial, and high costs to fix.  Global warming is the classic example of an Inconvenient Truth Gray Rhino. There are also the “Creative Destruction” Gray Rhinos such as Kodachrome, where acceptance and orderly unwinding are the only tenable solutions. It was not mama but the inevitable march of time that took our Kodachrome away. For each of the eight types in the taxonomy, all follow a life cycle of five stages. The first stage is denial, the second is muddling or kicking the can down the road, followed by haphazard diagnostic exercises, the third, panic, the fourth, and finally action.

Ms. Wucker’s Taxonomy and Stages are invaluable contributions to the ongoing policy discussion. The Taxonomy and Stages also need to be viewed in the context of organizational motivations and individual incentives, though. A good example is the Challenger disaster that Ms. Wucker opens her book with.  When making go/no-go decisions, it’s helpful to look at data from previous failures as well as data from previous successes. Space shuttles relied on re-usable solid rocket boosters for their initial launch. The boosters were built in segments and each segment had o-rings that were supposed to keep hot gas from escaping. When o-rings get too cold, they become brittle and fail allowing hot gasses to escape, which is what caused the Challenger disaster. On the morning of the launch, one engineer spoke up against the launch. The coldest successful launch took place when the temperature was 53 degrees. In that launch, gas escaped passed the first ring and caused corrosion on the backup ring, but the backup ring contained the gases. Below 53 degrees, there were no data. On the morning of the Challenger launch, the temperature was 35 degrees.

On January 28, 1986, NASA got an additional data point. The backup ring failed and seven astronauts died.  The Challenger disaster didn’t happen because the world’s smartest people didn’t understand the threat of cold weather to the proper function of o-rings. It happened because of the tremendous pressures on NASA to proceed with the launch. The space shuttle was originally conceived as a way to easily and cheaply launch people into space and return them in a re-usable ship.  The term “space bus” was even used. In practice, the program proved to be more costly and inefficient than the shuttle’s predecessors. NASA was under tremendous pressure to demonstrate the viability of the program.  In addition, the Challenger was going to launch the first teacher, Christa McAuliffe, into space. Millions of people were tuned to their television sets to see a launch that had already been delayed several times.  The organizational and public relations pressure to proceed with the launch overwhelmed good judgement.

Organizational pressures and incentive structures are that root of several Gray Rhinos. Scarce public funds either can be used to pay teachers or fix bridges that seem to work fine (until they don’t). Publicly traded companies struggle to look past obstacles beyond meeting quarterly numbers. Politicians aren’t incentivized to deal with any problem such as global warming whose most detrimental effects are likely to occur after a two, four, or six year term.

The assembled Book Club members and Ms. Wucker did offer several solutions to the Gray Rhino problem.  First, align incentives. Executive compensation should vest fully over a period of years or even decades.  Investors should similarly hold companies to account for long term performance and be more forgiving of short term volatility. Allowing US banks to hold stocks as banks do in Japan and Germany might allow more steady capital into capital markets and reward longer term performance, too. Second, break the problem into small pieces. There’s an old expression: “How do you eat an elephant? One bite at a time.” The same logic applies to Rhinos. Instead of trying to fix all the nations crumbling infrastructure, prioritize. Fix one bridge at a time, starting with the most dilapidated. Third, to combat groupthink and denial, include diverse perspectives in one’s circle and allow multiple channels of access to leaders and decision makers.  Related to that third point, the group discussed the competing leadership styles of Presidents Reagan and Kennedy. President Kennedy’s administration followed a spokes-on-a-wheel format where multiple influencers had direct access to the President, which could explain his successful resolution of the Cuban Missile Crisis. President Reagan, on the other hand, had a more linear chain of command with multiple bottlenecks and chokepoints, which could explain how in the Iran-Contra Affair a few rogue elements of his administration where able to conduct arms sales and a covert war without knowledge or involvement from either the State or Defense Departments.

The Gray Rhino is a welcome addition to current policy debates and compliments established organizational behavior and social science literature well. At 304 pages, it’s also a manageable and enjoyable read. The Society is very grateful to Ms. Wucker for her book and for her attendance at our meeting.

Volunteer of the Month: March 2017

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Spencer Kelly

Thank you to all the dedicated CFA Society Chicago volunteers who give selflessly of their time and talents! This month the Professional Development Advisory Group is recognizing Spencer Kelly.

New Candidate member Spencer Kelly joined the Society in November 2016 and hit the ground running with his volunteer participation. Spencer joined the Professional Development Advisory Group and signed up to help plan Industry Roundtables, one of the Society’s notable member-only events. He worked with a subcommittee to secure 12 roundtable hosts to discuss their respective sectors in the investment industry.

Please join the Society and the Professional Development Advisory Group in thanking Spencer for his contributions.

Distinguished Speaker Series: Richard Driehaus, Driehaus Capital Management LLC

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The Distinguished Speaker Series hosted Richard H. Driehaus at the Metropolitan Club Oak Room on March 1st, 2017. Mr. Driehaus is founder, chief investment officer and chairman of Driehaus Capital Management LLC. In 2000 he was named to Barron’s “All-Century” team whose players were deemed the most influential in the mutual fund industry over the past 100 years. Mr. Driehaus aim was to divide his presentation into three sections: Early Years, Investing, and Industry Trends.

DSC_3548He began his presentation by referencing the difficulties his father had in developing a residential lot his family owned. Although his father had a steady paycheck as a mechanical engineer, he was not able to afford his goal of developing the land for his expanding family. Mr. Driehaus at that point began thinking about how he would make sure to achieve his goals.

When he was 13, Mr. Driehaus spotted the NYSE quotes in a local newspaper. DSC_3533When informed about what the NYSE quotes meant, he became fascinated and soon found that his calling was the investment industry.

Mr. Driehaus argues that the principals of Taoism are applicable to the stock market. Taoism stresses living in harmony with the universal laws of nature. Nature has given man both a creative and analytic side to his brain. You must be able to use both sides of your brain to understand the market.

Mr. Driehaus shared the following market insights:

  • Stock price will almost always never equal a company’s intrinsic value. The valuation process is flawed.
  • It is better to concentrate in sectors as certain sectors will have better outlooks than the market as a whole.
  • More money is made by buying high and selling higher (positive relative strength).
  • Hit home runs, not singles and avoid striking out (cut your losses).
  • High turnover reduces risk; take a series of small losses but not a big loss.
  • Standard deviation is a poor measure of investment risk.
  • The greatest long term risk is not having enough exposure to risk.

Mr. Driehaus emphasized that continuous observation is needed for investment analysis.  Knowledge gained must then be applied in the context of a rapidly changing environment. You must maintain belief in your core principles for the long-term to succeed.

DSC_3541Mr. Driehaus had the following observations of the industry and current equity market:

  • A 60/40 equity/bond allocation will not be aggressive enough for retirees due to longer life spans.
  • As inflation becomes hotter bonds will be less attractive than stocks.
  • Active managers have been losing assets due to the lower fees associated with indexing.
  • Meaningful alpha generation is not easy in this environment but still doable.
  • Active management will outperform when interest rates normalize as equity dispersion will be greater.
  • Expect a greater shift to international equities.

Following his presentation Mr. Driehaus fielded questions on a number of topics:

  • Investing in growth stocks allowed him to prove himself more quickly.
  • Hedge funds are paralyzed because they want safety; they are not taking on enough risk to differentiate themselves.
  • Look closely at volume when you’re thinking about selling one of your winners.
  • His philanthropy emphasizes that architecture is very important. Big box retail has killed a number of small communities and failed to protect the “sense of place”.

CFA Society Chicago Progressive Networking Luncheon

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CFA Society Chicago’s Progressive Networking Luncheon held on February 22nd at Petterino’s was an opportunity with a different flavor than other networking events.  Featuring a three-course meal, each course provided an intimate opportunity to chat and really get to know fellow table guests.  As the course changed throughout the lunch, so did your table guests! The format transformed the networking from one with challenges to begin conversations to one in which fellow diners were a part of the flow of topics. It made it remarkably easy to ask questions, gain insights from others and provide your own food for thought.

The attendees were delightfully varied as well. In addition to attendees from industry mainstays such as Northern Trust and William Blair, others from further afield industries, yet still very much in finance roles, provided interesting insights. Students also had the opportunity to learn from potential future colleagues.

Join us next time to enjoy a great meal while networking with interesting people!

Distinguished Speaker Series: Charles Evans, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago

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Charles Evans, President and Chief Executive Officer, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago (Photo courtesy of Ping Homeric)

Charles Evans, president and chief executive officer of the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, addressed approximately 250 members and guests of the CFA Society Chicago on Thursday, February 9th at the Standard Club. The event was also webcast for those who could not attend the luncheon. Mr. Evans spoke about the U.S. economy, fiscal stimulus and monetary policy. He completed his presentation with responses to questions from the audience.

Mr. Evans expects a modest acceleration in economic growth to the 2.0% to 2.5% rate, and a rise in inflation to near 2.0% over the next several years. As a result, the Fed’s most likely course of action is three 0.25% increases in the Fed Funds rate in each of the next three years. These increases would elevate this rate to near 3.0% by the end of 2019. The primary risk to this outlook is that inflation does not rise to 2.0%.

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Chicago Fed President Charles Evans and CFA Society Chicago Board Members (Photo courtesy of Ping Homeric)

Fiscal policy could positively impact growth by near 0.25% a year. Lower tax rates might contribute to higher growth over the intermediate term. Additionally, optimistic consumer sentiment, resulting from healthy employment data, should contribute to growth. Average monthly gains of 180K employees over the past year have reduced the unemployment rate to 4.8%. A constraint has been business investment during the recovery, which shows no real sign of improvement.

Mr. Evans expects a decline in the unemployment rate to 4.25% by late 2019. His forecast is slightly lower than Fed’s consensus of 4.5%. The natural rate appears to be near 4.7%. A decline to the 4.25% to 4.50% range would suggest a Fed move from ease to neutral to tightening over the next several years. The downside risk to this outlook is weak foreign economies. The upside would be a greater boost from fiscal policy and regulatory ease.

Inflation has averaged 1.5% since 2009. The “Core” rate has moved up to 1.7%. Mr. Evans expects core inflation to reach 2.0% over the next three years. The downside risk is low global inflation and a strong dollar.

The structural equilibrium neutral Fed Funds rate has fallen to a lower level. Low interest rates, throughout the world, provide the central banks with less room for ease in the next downturn. The Fed has typically lowered the Fed Funds by greater than 5.0%, during easing periods and currently believes that the neutral rate is near 3.0% (1% real and 2.0% inflation). Therefore, they may not have as much room to lower rates during next recession. The secondary tools would be quantitative easing and guidance for how long rates would remain low. These non-conventional methods are “second best” to the ability to lower rates.

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Distinguished Speaker Series featuring Charles Evans

 

From 1960 to 2000, the economy grew at a 3.5% annual rate. Post 2000, the growth rate has been lower. The labor force participation rate has fallen over the past 15 years; because of retiring baby boomers, passing the peak inflow of women into the labor force, and a falling rate of employment for 18 to 24-year-old individuals. The potential real GDP growth rate has probably fallen to near 1.75%.

During the questions and answers segment, Mr. Evans addressed the following topics:

  1. CFA-Society-Cindy-Anggraini-from-Indonesia-010917-PingHomeric-0G1A5073

    President Charles Evans responds to questions from the audience.              (Photo courtesy of Ping Homeric)

    Long-term interest rates have risen 0.50% since the election, suggesting that the markets expect some positive impact from fiscal and regulatory policies. He noted that changes in tax policy (i.e. eliminate deductions, border adjusting tax, etc.) can be disruptive in the intermediate term, even though positive in the long-term.

  2. The Fed’s balance sheet grew from $800 M to $4.5 T. Eventually, this level is likely to fall back to near $1.5 T. The Most likely path would be through not re-invest principal payments.
  3. The impact of technology on productivity was apparent in 1995 to 2005 data. Since then, it has not been. He referenced the “gee-wiz” nature of more recent new technologies and quick obsolescence.
  4. The Fed chose not to use negative interest rates, even though the Taylor Rule suggested -4.0% at the low point. The Fed chose quantitative easing instead- sold short bonds and bought long. He noted some positive effect in Europe, which could influence future Fed boards.
  5. Finally, he noted that more global trade is better, provided it’s fair. Trade increases competition, which encourages higher productivity. The United Kingdom is likely to face a complicated period ahead to exit from the EU and establish new trade agreements.